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Open Source

How You can Have an Impact on European Openness Policy

EC LogoAre there political dimensions to open source software and hardware? Americans might be surprised to see such a question, given Washington’s almost complete indifference to the dramatic rise of these approaches to technology development. But that’s not the case in many other parts of the world, and particularly in Europe, where the European Commission (EC) and the governments of many constituent nations have taken great interest in not only promoting the uptake of open source software, and, more recently hardware, but pursuing these same priorities in their procurement decisions and establishment of inter-country communication platforms and protocols.

This process continues, and you can have an impact on future decision making by participating in a survey commissioned by the EC to guide its ongoing open source policy development.

Some Concerns Open Source Should Worry About - Part 1

Courtesy of Linda F. Palmer/Wikimedia Commons -  GNU Free Documentation LicenseNot long ago, the Linux community celebrated the twenty-fifth anniversary of Linus Torvalds’ famous Internet post, and thus its birth. While Linux was not the first open source project (Richard Stallman announced his GNU Project eight years before), it soon became the poster child of a new way of collaborative development that changed not only how technology is created, but many other aspects of the world as well. Today, most critical software platforms and architectures are open source, and virtually all proprietary software is riddled with free and open source software (FOSS) as well.

So, what could go wrong? Well, a lot, actually, unless we pause to think about where the potholes may emerge in the future, and how we can successfully navigate our way around them. That’s what I plan to do in  a series of articles to which this is the introduction.

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